Taxes, more taxes, and … “recreational” marijuana

October 11, 2015

With the ink barely dry on Oregon's costly Low Carbon Fuel Standard law, Portland city commissioner Steve Novick bets than a 10-cents-a-gallon gas tax will be his ticket to re-election. Along the way, Ann asks the question: What if we can say how our tax dollars are spent? 

We wrap with the one "sin" that's not subject to a "sin tax." That's right, "recreational" marijuana in Oregon is not taxed. Who will be the first politician to come out of the ganja closet? 
Here’s how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

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Unspoiled by progress

October 3, 2015

With legalization of recreational marijuana sales in Oregon just a day away, Portland City Hall is still working out how it plans to regulate the new business. What have they been doing for the past year? 

This is nothing new, however. The most progressive city in the U.S. often seems stymied by progress. New businesses and technologies seem to take city council by surprise. More than one commissioner is still stuck in the pre-smartphone era. 
How can city government regulation entire industries, when the decision makers are simultaneously surprised, scared, and befuddled by technological progress? Tuesday Memo and Econ Minute try to answer these questions and more.
 Here's how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

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Déjà vu all over again

October 3, 2015

It’s "déjà vu all over again" on the Tuesday Memo / Econ Minute podcast.

  • A few days after Los Angeles declares a state of emergency on homeless, Portland's Mayor Charlie Hales enters "me too" mode and declares a state of emergency in Portland ... even though homelessness has been an emergency since he was city commissioner 20 years ago.
  • Yet again, even though the city can't find money for homelessness or streets ... Portland has $3.3 million to pour into the streetcar for - get this - marketing!
  • Citizen activists get a ballot title to change the make-up of city council. Now, can they get the signatures?

Here's how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo.

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.

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TuesdayMemo/EconMinute podcast: Win-win

September 18, 2015

"Win-win" is the topic for this week's podcast because it's "game on" for Portland's election season.

  • Oregon state treasurer Ted Wheeler enters the Portland mayor's race, facing off against incumbent Charlie Hales. The candidates are virtual twins: both are former Republicans turned Democrats, each trying the show that he is the most serious progressive candidate (or the most progressive serious candidate). What is the one issue on which they differ?
  • A majority of city council is up for grabs. Where are all the candidates? Where are Portland's Trumps and Sanders?
  • Mayor Hales has a plan to make housing more affordable ... by making it more expensive.
  • Trees, trees, and more trees. If you thought bikes were a source of city strife, try cutting down some 100 year old trees.

Here's how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo

For a minute or so of economics, read the EconMinute blog.
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TuesdayMemo and EconMinute team up to podcast about Portland

August 10, 2015

TuesdayMemo and EconMinute team up for a very Portland podcast. We bring together politics, economics, and a dose of common sense into the conversation about what's happening in Oregon's biggest city.

This episode, for the first week of August 2015, covers a wide range of topics:

  • Greenpeace vs. Flugtag: The contrast between how officials treat protestors illegally blocking the Willamette River and how they treat those who jump through the hoops to get a permit. For a bonus, we learn what Portland Mayor Charlie Hales was doing while river was shut down.
  • Then we talk about the mayor's friends in high places. And some of the friends of City Hall. Q: How do you know that Charlie Hales has met the Pope or President? A: He won't stop talking about it.
  • We end with a chat about "Ban the Box." What's Ban the Box? Listen and find out!

Here's how you can hear more:

  • Listen on Podbean, the podcasting platform.
  • The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.

For blogging on the Portland City Council scene, check out TuesdayMemo

For a minute or more of economics, read the EconMinute blog.
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Hillary Clinton, jobs, Big Bird, and trolls all in one short podcast!

June 19, 2015

Big issues in this week's Econ Minute Podcast: 

  • Hillary Clinton gets it wrong on the economy jobs connection.
  • Don't blame Baby Boomers for the shrinking labor force.
  • Does Big Bird make kids smarter? Does Spongebob make them stupid? Some lessons in pop culture and pop science.
  • Are all Internet trolls bad? Can they be a force for good?
All these topics are covered on one short podcast.
For more, visit the Econ Minute blog.
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The worst solution to homelessness, Millennials and their parents, and a taste of Chinese wines

May 14, 2015

This week's Econ Minute Podcast spans the globe and crosses generations. 

First we have what may be the one of the worst solutions to urban homelessness. Cities across the globe go to great lengths to get their homeless population out from under bridges and away from railroad tracks. Progressive Portland turns that goal on it's head. The city's mayor is finalizing a deal to purchase some land under a under a bridge and only few feet away from an active railway line. His goal: Move some of downtown Portland's homeless population to a place where they are out of sight and out of mind. 
Next we follow up on our look at millennials and see how their parents are changing TV programming. 
We end with a story of a bold prediction that came true regarding China's burgeoning wine business. 
The podcast is now available on iTunes. Please subscribe to make the most of your weekly Econ Minute.
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Uber, criminal background checks, streetcars, and transportation safety. Does education pass the “smell test?”

May 7, 2015

This week's podcast looks at intersection of the ridesharing service Uber, criminal background checks, streetcars, and transportation safety. And, yes, they are all related.

Then we turn to education and economic development and whether education passes a controversial "smell test."

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Millennials, affordable housing, and taxing star scientists

April 30, 2015

What are Millennials and what do they want?

Econ Minute answers that with a presentation from the PSU Center for Real Estate Annual Conference. Get inside the minds of the mysterious Millennials and learn how they and their parents will change the world.

Next, we spend a few minutes on affordable housing and look at how it's a problem worsened by policy.

We end with a look at income taxes and the role they play in attracting scientists to a state ... or driving them out.

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Gridlock, Painkiller Abuse, Jobs, and Free Speech

April 30, 2015

Podcast: Gridlock, Painkiller Abuse, Jobs, and Free Speech. For more, visit EconMinute.com.

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